‘LA Noire’ is set in 1940s Los Angeles. To what extent do you feel that this game would provide an effective introduction to the concept of ‘genre’? What are the key characteristics of ‘noir’?

In your answer you should consider form, structure and language, as well as subject matter.
Read More »

Share

L.A Noire incredulously shows the spirit of Los Angelas in many ways. It perfectly depicts the transparent themes from the Noir Genre from the very beginning, the menu interface brings you into the typical black and white feel of mystery with a silhouette of a man in the background and billowing steam transplants the feel further. For the characters the most obvious character being Phelps is the man vocal point that brings out the plot that makes a Noir film. A man in the force with a troubled past is faced with the new playground of being a cop, from a strangled relationship with being a soldier he is thrust into a world of discipline and the corrupt. The background of Phelps gives that idea of a hollowed out cop, not the typical straight faced man in a suit doing his job but someone we see through to the bone. We follow nothing except Phelp’s journey through the police force which makes it apparent with the Noir setting.
Read More »

Share

Film noir’s portrayal of the “femme fatale” supports the existing social order by building up a powerful, independent woman, only to punish her. To what extent do you agree with this in relation to the portrayal of women in ‘LA Noire’?

 
Read More »

Share

There are not many women shown in the game LA Noire, and those who actually are hiding behind men as they aren’t shown alone. This is because they fear the male characters, and instead of speaking up front hide behind the scenes and stay quiet and only speak and appear when they need to. The very few female characters that are shown in La Noire are previous victims of abuse and murder, so people constantly take advantage of this. This makes it clear that there is a major divide between the female and male species, as the male’s attitude is totally different. Cole Phelps and his crew, try to protect the fact that young men value the innocence that young girls have. However, they are horrified to hear that criminals abuse this and use it in their own way to provide for themselves. Detective like Cole Phelps and crew don’t always trust women, this is because they lie and look around for financial success. The women in LA Noire are forced to find a man, for this in the long run they do get used. The independent women shown in the game are shown to be alcoholics, for people to show no respect towards them. We can see this from the Black Dahlia cases, people do not like the idea of independent women as they are not controlled and are controlled by their own minds compared to taken women who are controlled by their partners. LA Noire uses women in two main roles either as a victim or a criminal, as this reflects the time period the game was set in, in 1940s America. Women can’t be police detectives within the game as they have no main part in the story the game appears to tell, the women are just used as props for Cole and his crew to carry on from case to case. The game just jumps from one female character to the next this portrays that they have no importance whatsoever as they get forgotten when they move and focus on another character within the game. To conclude this, I agree with the fact that Film Noir’s portrayal of the “femme fatale” supports the existing social order by building up a powerful, independent woman, only to punish her. I do also agree with this in relation to the portrayal of women in ‘LA Noire’. The females shown in LA Noire lack in power as they cannot stand up to the males in the game, this is why things happen to the female characters like murder. This is because they can’t protect themselves in any way shape or form.

Share

I really do apologise for my lack of activity, but my TV broke and I forgot to take L.A. Noire home with me for the Easter holidays…

 

But yes, I agree that film noir does play a part in L.A. Noire especially with regards to the ‘femme fatale’ stereotype. We see this in a lot of cases throughout where a man has denied allegations that he is the antagonist and has used a woman in such a way that she is immediately seen as the criminal. That said, a lot of the time, in cases I cannot distinctly describe but recall vaguely, we see and/or find out that a woman has been the sole perpetrator in a crime. Whether that be because she wanted to kill her husband for her money, or merely to be rid of him to run off with someone else.
Read More »

Share

Film noir’s portrayal of the “femme fatale” supports the existing social order by building up a powerful, independent woman, only to punish her. To what extent do you agree with this in relation to the portrayal of women in ‘LA Noire’?

Femme fatale literally translates as ‘fatal woman’.
Read More »

Share

Does the game represent men and women in stereotypical ways? What about other categories – age and ethnicity for example? Time period? Setting?

Whilst playing LA Noire that the game uses stereotypical characters to create a realistic impression of 1940′s/50′s American culture. As regards gender, women are frequently portrayed as the victim, as in the first set of investigations where all the homicide victims are women, and the deaths often appear to be of a sexual nature.
Read More »

Share

1.

Whilst playing the game I found myself to try and do my best for Phelps. Like trying my best instead of crashing into cars like you have to when you are playing Grand Theft Auto. You get enough information about him so you know what his aims are.
Read More »

Share

1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

As playing as Cole Phelps i feel that i take on his lifestyle and work life in one. It is very interesting learning about his life and everything about him. The fact that you are able to make decisions on his work and how he does everything makes you feel that you really are apart of the game.
Read More »

Share

Cole Phelps – Cole Phelps was born in Sanfancisco. He attended Stanford University. He married a woman named Marie and had two daughters with her. Cole went to Officer Candidate School for the United States Marine Corps. He befriended Hank Merrill and developed an intense rivalry with Jack Kelso. In the days following his recruitment, he was given top honors for his bravery; however, during his time in the USMC, he has been known as the “Dark Shadow” or considered to be “bad luck” whenever someone is under his command during combat. Cole prefers to play it by-the-books rather than cutting corners, this creates issues between him and his more laid back partners he works with. He has a clear understanding and knowledge and completes his jobs and cases to the best of his ability, he seems keen and eager about his work.
Read More »

Share