Does the game represent men and women in stereotypical ways? What about other categories – age and ethnicity for example? Time period? Setting?

All stereotypes are arguably based on (half-)truths–albeit oft-exaggerated and oversimplified–that may not be as relevant in one setting and time than in another. For instance, to say that all women should be, and are, housewives would be outlandishly inaccurate today and would be considered ‘politically incorrect’, but go back half a century or more and you’re making an accurate statement that reflects the views of most of the population at the time.
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Hi everyone.

Thanks for all the really interesting posts that have come in over the Easter break.

In order to give everyone time to play the game and catch up, you now have until Monday April 23rd to post your responses to weeks / questions 1, 2 and 3, and to make sure you have added some comments to other posts for each week.
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Does the game represent men and women in stereotypical ways? What about other categories – age and ethnicity for example? Time period? Setting?

The game represents women and men in different ways because of the time period that the game is set in. Females were often stay at home wives whose job was to look after their husband. If the woman did work then they are usually shown to be waitresses or secretaries.
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I think that this is possibly one of the biggest issues to draw when analysing any work of literature (be it film, game or text) is that of gender, and L.A. Noire does not fail to present a world in which gender is something that is vital to the development of the narrative.
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Question 3

 

For the time that L.A Noire is set it is very stereotypical how each gender is treated, from the very beginning to seeing the women in the shop (first interviewee) we can see that women are depicted in a lower stance than men are. They are the gender lingering in the background of the power struggle between men and women; from a Marxist point of view it is evident of the struggle of these class struggles. I talk of class struggles as this epoch man a power of men whilst women still suffer from patriarchy in that they had little impact on society at all. They stay in the shadows being housewives whilst the men go out and do the important work and have all the action, this is the conclusion I have made so far. The women are the victims of the action rather than the person taking part.
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Over the next 2 weeks we want you start by thinking about how L. A Noire represents gender. Does the game represent men and women in stereotypical ways? What about other categories – age and ethnicity for example? Time period? Setting?

I feel that the game represents men and women very stereotypically according to both their gender and the time era that L.A Noire is set in. Men are always in roles of responsibility and leadership, whereas women are all assistants and in secretarial type roles. They are also more often the victim than men, which is a stereotypical representation of female weakness and male strength. Any women that could possibly be suspects are seen to be conniving and quite vindictive; the stereotypical ‘bitch’ or ‘scorned woman’ role.
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L.A. Noire represents masculinity, femininity and race, for me, exactly how I would expect people to have truly acted and thought in 1947. Some of the characters, with the possible exception of Cole Phelps, seem very misogynistic in their attitudes towards women. His two partners, who fit this bill the best, are Rusty Galloway and Roy Earle, who both share a distinct distrust and dislike of women. Rusty makes his distrust of women known almost from the outset, he even goes as far as to accuse the women in cases of cheating on their husbands (such as the victim, in The Golden Butterfly case), calling upon his own experiences to solidify his feelings, his three divorces seem to be the reason for his distrust, he even states on another of the cases “If I killed every wife that served me papers I’d be a mass murderer”.
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1. Please write character descriptions for any TWO interesting characters you have encountered in the game so far. These should be about 50 words each.

Cole Phelps: Phelps stars as the strong minded detective who is the central character in this game. Once joining the police force Phelps exceeded at his job and was quick to gain a higher job role. The game focuses in on Cole’s job life and home life. The character is easily liked at the beginning and seems to show a in depth knowledge of his area of profession. However as the game continues and more of his life is revealed he starts to seem less of the good guy that he was portrayed as at the beginning. Once he is caught red handed on issues with his wife we see how quickly everything begins to fall apart.
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Does the game represent men and women in stereotypical ways? What about other categories – age and ethnicity for example? Time period? Setting?

It quickly became apparent to me whilst playing LA Noire that the game uses stereotypical characters to create a realistic impression of 1940′s/50′s American culture. As regards gender, women are frequently portrayed as the victim, as in the first set of investigations where all the homicide victims are women, and the deaths often appear to be of a sexual nature. As well as this, women are often described in relation to men, who appear to have more power in the game world. I played the game through with my girlfriend and she did not feel alienated through playing as a man, and by the way that women are portrayed. She described this as similar to watching a film such as ‘Dick Tracey’, it is simply a more male orientated plot. I do think it is significant that the most notably strong female character in the game is Elsa, yet she is frowned upon by other characters in the game because of her independence which seems to be uncharacteristic for women at the time the game is set in. Similarly, it is notable that she is the women that Phelps falls in love with, I think this shows that her strength and independence are essentially good characteristics.
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1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

With Cole Phelps, I always seem to find myself wanting more from him. Although he has had an eventful past and a killer back story, it’s not really shown enough to me. I struggle to connect with him and due to this I’d say that I don’t really inhabit the character. I find myself throughout the game trying to find out about the other characters and other stories more than I do Cole.
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