1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

Cole Phelps I seem to take a lot of interest in, he seems like a clever guy and I enjoy playing with him. I see everything through his eyes and his decisions are made by me but while I make them, I make them how I feel he would want me to. It’s not my decision per se. I try (sadly) to conduct myself how I feel he would too, I’m not rude, I take my time and drive safely (hahaha). I fully try to find myself within him but also play as him.
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1. In some games, the player’s character has no defined charateristics, and is a blank slate for the player to make thier own choices and create their own avatar. However, LA Noire is a character driven narrative, with the story of Phelps being front and centre. This lack of overt choice and linear storytelling means that the player is forced to identify with the character of Phelps, since they are forced by the narrative to be Phelps, and see things from his point of view.
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1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

I’m glad this question came up, because this is one of the aspects of LA Noire that intrigued me the most. I found that whilst playing as Cole Phelps, the flawed hero, I found that I came to dislike him a little. Clearly, he is only human, and we all make mistakes, but his frequent poor judgement let him down. It if for this reason that I found I didn’t try to inhabit Phelps whilst playing as him. I did not feel that I was actually Phelps, more that I was fulfilling his destiny laid out by the game, I was guiding him through the investigations, but in the back of my mind I already knew they would be successful. In this way, it was more like watching a film than playing a game. As the game set up the idea of a character I was controlling, but detached from, when playing as Kelso it was as if he was another actor to guide through the game.
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1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

As a player there is always a certain amount of “inhabiting” of a player. We are given enough information on Cole Phelps to know his personality and motivations, which did influence my actions in the game. For example, in the driving sections I always tried my best to not hit anyone (although I was hindered by the controls), in contrast to, for example, a Grand Theft Auto game where a player can gain money for hitting pedestrians.
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1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

Mentally a person must get in character and begin to think like the character in order to get through the game. The content and progression of the game depends upon the actions and the player’s control of that character. Therefore the game is designed to make the player think like the specific character. For example the game has boundaries that the player must adhere to. I quickly learned that when I tried to drive over a few pedestrians… not purposefully though, I lost control of the car! Well not quite I was wondering if it was similar to Grand Theft Auto… ironically the first thing I did in the game (attempting to kill innocent people) established my control and boundaries as a player. After confirming how far I could exploit my authority as a cop, it is clear that you get what you are given and the actions you take are based on those pre-established rules. The game sets the boundaries so you must apply yourself to them. Whether or not you make a conscious effort to become the character on screen is irrelevant, because you are made to step in to the role and persona of the character from the beginning of the game. Therefore in my opinion, the game is always in control, in the same way a novel is. You cannot change the events, unless the game gives you the power to do so.
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1. In a game I would inhabit the ‘character’ i’m playing to the extent the game will allow. Given the personality or backstory of the character I will sympathise with them in certain ways and play that character how I believe they would be, should the freedom within the game be given.
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Personally speaking, upon starting any game that I play, I generally like to feel that I ‘am’ the character and decisions that I make within a game would be my own, therefore I could gain some affinity with the character at the very least, if not fully immerse myself in being that character. This usually helps me to see the world through the character that I’m playing, as their decisions and, even when they look nothing like me (Such as Niko Bellic), I still see them as myself, and this in turn makes potential decisions about the fate of other characters in the game very difficult to make, as they are no longer just random computer generated imagery, but rather, friends.
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L.A Noire week 2

1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

With every game played it becomes impossible not to get personally involved with the character you’re playing. Your own characteristics depend on how you play the game, for me in such games as these I’m attentive and thoughtful, patience is a virtue and God forbid you need lots for this game. You begin to immerse yourself in the game trying to elaborate to believe you are the character and that he/she is not a separate entity. Much the same in novels I begin to feel the character, how they interact to everything; people, events and locations. Through development of character both through story and progressing through ranks and levels.
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Cole Phelps – Cole is an ambitious policeman, working his way up through the force using his ruthlessness gained from the army, and his cunning in solving the crimes. He is a very interesting character as you see through the way he acts and the flashbacks throughout the game that there are two sides to Cole. When you see the flashbacks you see him as a top of the class army sergeant, who doesn’t care for friends, he is there to do his duty and not worry about who he annoys. When you are playing as him in the games present day, you see him as more compassionate towards his colleagues and whilst still being quite knowledgeable, he doesn’t show it in an arrogant way.
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  1. 1. How far would you say you try and inhabit the ‘character’ you’re ‘playing’?

No matter what game I’m playing I have a fixed way of playing the character, a way that feels right. When it comes to role playing games I am always the good guy, more so on games that reflect player choices, in a shooter I’m a bold leader and in beat ‘em ups the relentless button masher. With LA Noire you are instantly told that Phelps is supposed to be a good guy, flawed, but still a justice seeking detective. This led me to drive carefully, listen to everything my partners said and try to solve what I could without violence. This however did make the game even more linear than it already was, pushing me to follow a single line of inquiry throughout the entire game, never deviating until all the cases had been completed to the highest rank.
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